login
Password reminder
Cardiovascular News
Contact the editor Visit Cardiovascular News Twitter feed Visit Cardiovascular News Facebook page
 

Cox-maze IV: new treatments for AF


Wednesday, 16 May 2007 00:00

Current treatments for atrial fibrillation (AF) include medications, electrical cadioversion (used to restore normal heart rhythm with an electric shock), radiofrequency ablation, surgery and atrial pacemakers. Some of these approaches are complex and time-consuming, therefore a new device has been developed that radically reduces surgery time as well as simplifies complex procedures used to treat persistent AF.

Heart surgeons at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, MO, have simplified a common surgical procedure used to treat AF, termed Cox-maze, in which they hope will be made available to more patients. The new procedure, Cox-maze IV could potentially replace the older 'cut and sew' Cox-maze III, in which ten precisely placed incisions in the heart muscle created a 'maze' to redirect errant electrical impulses.

In a recent study published in the February issue of Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery,

Dr Ralph Damiano, the John Shoenberg professor of Surgery and chief of cardiac surgery at the School of Medicine and a cardiac surgeon at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, and colleagues compared surgical outcomes of patients undergoing the Cox-maze III procedure versus those of patients undergoing the Cox-maze IV procedure by using propensity analysis. According to the researchers, from April 1992 to July 2005, 242 patients underwent the Cox-maze procedure. Of these, 154 patients had the Cox-maze III procedure, and 88 had the Cox-maze IV procedure.

"Using the significant regression coefficients, each patient's propensity score was calculated, allowing selectively matched subgroups of 58 patients each," they reported. Late follow-up was available for 112 (97%) patients, and freedom from AF recurrence and survival was calculated at one year by using Kaplan-Meier analysis.

The new device is a clamp-like instrument that heats heart tissue using radiofrequency energy. By grasping areas of the heart within the jaws of the device, surgeons can create lines of ablation on the heart muscle. In the older Cox-maze III procedure, the lines of ablation were made by cutting the heart muscle, sewing the incisions back together and letting a scar form.

The results demonstrated that the use of bipolar radiofrequency ablation has simplified the Cox-maze procedure, making it applicable to virtually all patients with AF undergoing concomitant cardiac surgery.

"This technology has made the Cox-maze procedure much easier and quicker to perform," says Damiano. "Instead of reserving the Cox-maze procedure for a select group of patients, we would urge use of this device for virtually all patients who have AF and are scheduled for other cardiac surgery."

"The older Cox-maze procedure was a very complicated operation, and very few surgeons were willing to do it," said Damiano. "So we started working on new technology and helped develop an effective ablation device that simplifies the procedure. Not only is Cox-maze IV shorter, but with the new device the procedure is also much safer because there's a much lower risk of bleeding."

Damiano believes that their most recent study of Cox-maze IV is unique because the surgeons carefully matched the age, sex and cardiac conditions of a group of patients who underwent Cox-maze III in the past with patients undergoing Cox-maze IV. "This is the first documentation of the effectiveness of the ablation devices compared to the incisions of the Cox-maze III," Damiano says. "This operation is very effective, and we now use the Cox-maze IV technique exclusively."



Most popular


Abbott to acquire St Jude Medical
Tuesday, 03 May 2016
Abbott is set to acquire St Jude Medical, expanding its portfolio to cover cardiovascular markets such as atrial fibrillation, structural heart and heart failure as well as neuromodulation. The ... Abbott to acquire St Jude Medical

French hospital celebrates 30 years of implanting artificial hearts
Wednesday, 13 Apr 2016
La Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital (Paris, France), the world’s leading artificial heart centre, is celebrating the 30th anniversary of the first Total Artificial Heart implantation. The centre has now ... French hospital celebrates 30 years of implanting artificial hearts

Tuesday, 05 Apr 2016
One-month, follow-up patient cohort data from the Revelution trial of Medtronic’s novel drug-filled stent indicate that device is associated with rapid vessel healing without inflammation, as ... Early data show good rapid healing for Medtronic’s investigational drug-filled stent

Features


Exploring the role of P2Y12 inhibitor monotherapy after dual antiplatelet therapy
Monday, 09 May 2016
According to Usman Baber, TWILIGHT is a unique and innovative study in that the experimental intervention is to withdraw rather than add to existing background pharmacotherapy. In this commentary, he ... Exploring the role of P2Y12 inhibitor monotherapy after dual antiplatelet therapy

The role of sutureless and rapid-deployment valves
Tuesday, 05 Apr 2016
Antonio Miceli explores the data for sutureless and rapid-deployment surgical valves for the management of patients with severe aortic stenosis. He also reviews the place of these new devices ... The role of sutureless and rapid-deployment valves

Profiles


Alexandra Lansky
Monday, 07 Mar 2016
Alexandra Lansky (Director, Heart and Vascular Clinical Research Program, Yale University School of ... Alexandra Lansky

Corrado Tamburino
Tuesday, 20 Oct 2015
Corrado Tamburino (full professor of Cardiology, Ferrarotto & Policlinico Hospitals, University of C... Corrado Tamburino

Cardiac Rhythm News Vascular News Cardiovascular News Interventional News Spinal News NeuroNews
BIBA Medical BIBA MedTech Insights CX Symposium ilegx
Password Reminder

BIBA Medical, 526 Fulham Road, Fulham, London, SW6 5NR.
TEL: +44 (0)20 7736 8788 FAX: +44 (0)20 7736 8283 EMAIL: 
info@bibamedical.com
© BIBA Medical Ltd is a company registered in England and Wales with company number 2944429.
VAT registration number 730 6811 50.
Site Map | Terms and Conditions