login
Password reminder
Cardiac Rhythm News
Contact the editor Visit Cardiac Rhythm News Twitter feed Visit Cardiac Rhythm News Facebook page
 

New imaging approach may assist in predicting success of treatment for AF


Thursday, 05 Mar 2009 10:34

University of Utah researchers have developed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based method for detecting and quantifying injury to the wall of the heart’s left atrium in patients who have undergone a procedure to treat atrial fibrillation. The results of the study were published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
Previous research suggested scar formation within the left atrium (LA) after radiofrequency (RF) ablation helps to predict the success of the procedure in preventing the recurrence of atrial fibrillation.


"Until now, there has not been an accurate, non-invasive way to assess LA scar formation," said lead author Dr Nassir F Marrouche, assistant professor of internal medicine in the University of Utah School of Medicine and director of its Atrial-Fibrillation Program. "We have developed a novel MRI-based method to detect and measure the extent of LA wall scarring and, potentially, predict the success of RF ablation in patients with atrial fibrillation."


In this study, Marrouche and his University of Utah colleagues developed a technique for using a non-invasive method called delayed-enhancement cardiovascular MRI (DE-CMRI) to create 3D images of the left atrium both before and after RF ablation in patients with atrial fibrillation. They processed and analysed these images using custom software tools and then used computer algorithms to calculate the extent of LA wall injury.


Marrouche and his colleagues found that all patients who underwent RF ablation showed evidence of left atrium wall injury on MRI three months after the procedure. The pattern of tissue injury correlated with the areas where the radiofrequency energy was applied during RF ablation, and thus, was presumed to reflect tissue scarring. Marrouche and his colleagues also found patients with a higher percentage of LA wall injury were more likely to be free of arrhythmia than patients with lower percentages, suggesting the degree of scarring is linked to the likelihood of success in the RF ablation procedure.


"DE-CMRI is an established method for evaluating the tissues of the heart after a heart attack," said Marrouche. "But performing DE-CMRI to detect left atrium wall injury is challenging because the wall of the left atrium is so thin."


The 3D technique used by Marrouche and his colleagues achieves a much greater imaging resolution than the two-dimensional technique typically used to evaluate the extent of tissue damage after a heart attack or in other cardiac disease processes. Marrouche and his colleagues also developed methods of processing the MRI images in order to visualise the entire volume of left atrium wall injury in 3D.


The novel visualisation technique and analysis developed by Marrouche and his colleagues potentially could help doctors improve planning for RF ablation procedures by making it easier to identify the heart muscle cells that need to be destroyed. Improved localisation and isolation of these heart muscle cells would likely lead to a reduction in the recurrence rate of AF.


"The benefit of 3D MRI is that it visualises the entire LA wall," said Marrouche. "And, it is safe and non-invasive, so it can be repeated without significant risk to the patient."




Add New Comment

Most popular


New bidirectional mechanical lead extraction device is safe and efficient with high success rates in long implanted leads
Thursday, 17 Mar 2016
A new bidirectional rotational mechanical lead extraction sheath is both safe and effective in performing lead extraction, according to a study published online ahead-of-print in Europace. Clinical ... New bidirectional mechanical lead extraction device is safe and efficient with high success rates in long implanted leads

FDA proposes ban on most powdered medical gloves
Tuesday, 22 Mar 2016
The US Food and Drug Administration has announced a proposal to ban most powdered gloves in the USA. While use of these gloves is decreasing, they pose an unreasonable and substantial risk of illness ... FDA proposes ban on most powdered medical gloves

First leadless pacemaker approved in the USA
Wednesday, 06 Apr 2016
Medtronic has announced it has received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for its Micra Transcatheter Pacing System (TPS). The leadless device, which is 93% smaller than conventional ... First leadless pacemaker approved in the USA

Features


How innovation can unleash tremendous growth in the $3.4 billion AF ablation market
Monday, 29 Feb 2016
Shlomo Ben-Haim (London, UK), a professor of medicine and serial entrepreneur in the medical device industry, examines the drivers of expansion of the atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation market, the ... How innovation can unleash tremendous growth in the $3.4 billion AF ablation market

Hybrid and surgical atrial fibrillation ablation: Opportunity, threat or both?
Monday, 15 Feb 2016
Despite major advances in techniques and technology over the past 15 years, the clinical outcomes for catheter ablation in non-paroxysmal atrial fibrillation patients remain disappointing, write Tom W... Hybrid and surgical atrial fibrillation ablation: Opportunity, threat or both?

Profiles


George Van Hare
Wednesday, 04 May 2016
George Van Hare (The Louis Larrick Ward professor of Pediatrics and director, Division of Pediatric ... George Van Hare

Jonathan Kalman
Monday, 18 Jan 2016
A leading heart rhythm expert in Australia, Jonathan M Kalman directs both clinical and research ... Jonathan Kalman

Cardiac Rhythm News Vascular News Cardiovascular News Interventional News Spinal News NeuroNews
BIBA Medical BIBA MedTech Insights CX Symposium ilegx
Password Reminder

BIBA Medical, 526 Fulham Road, Fulham, London, SW6 5NR.
TEL: +44 (0)20 7736 8788 FAX: +44 (0)20 7736 8283 EMAIL: 
info@bibamedical.com
© BIBA Medical Ltd is a company registered in England and Wales with company number 2944429.
VAT registration number 730 6811 50.
Site Map | Terms and Conditions